April 2014 - News!

Conferences, Symposiums, Workshops     view all upcoming

 

AIRS News

  • Congratulations to Charlene Santoni (University of Toronto DMA student, yr. 2, and AIRS sub-theme 2.2 participant), who has won the 2014 NATS Foundation Vocal Pedagogy Award for the USA and Canada

The Award is in support of her dissertation, which will propose the implementation of instructional singing voice techniques in the rehabilitative voice therapy protocol for children with vocal fold immobility.  Charlene also teaches voice at McMaster University and is a research assistant at AIRS (Advancing Interdisciplinary Research in Singing), and the Centre for Opera Studies in Italy (COSI).

 

Natural auditory environments contain multiple simultaneously-sounding objects and the auditory system must parse the incoming complex sound wave they collectively create into parts that represent each of these individual objects. Music often similarly requires processing of more than one voice or stream at the same time, and behavioral studies demonstrate that human listeners show a systematic perceptual bias in processing the highest voice in multi-voiced music. Here, we review studies utilizing event-related brain potentials (ERPs), which support the notions that (1) separate memory traces are formed for two simultaneous voices (even without conscious awareness) in auditory cortex and (2) adults show more robust encoding (i.e., larger ERP responses) to deviant pitches in the higher than in the lower voice, indicating better encoding of the former. Furthermore, infants also show this high-voice superiority effect, suggesting that the perceptual dominance observed across studies might result from neurophysiological characteristics of the peripheral auditory system. Although musically untrained adults show smaller responses in general than musically trained adults, both groups similarly show a more robust cortical representation of the higher than of the lower voice. Finally, years of experience playing a bass-range instrument reduces but does not reverse the high voice superiority effect, indicating that although it can be modified, it is not highly neuroplastic. Results of new modeling experiments examined the possibility that characteristics of middle-ear filtering and cochlear dynamics (e.g., sup- pression) reflected in auditory nerve firing patterns might account for the higher-voice superiority effect. Simulations show that both place and temporal AN coding schemes well-predict a high-voice superiority across a wide range of interval spacings and registers. Collectively, we infer an innate, peripheral origin for the higher-voice superiority observed in human ERP and psychophysical music listening studies.

 

For a pop song that contains all the musical and lyrical depth of a radio jingle, Pharrell Wil­liams’s Happy is showing remarkable longevity. More than three months since its release, the hit registered its one-millionth sale and became the longest running No 1 in Australia this decade, takings its place atop the ARIA singles chart for the 10th week. Happy is now tied equal second for longest running No 1 for this century.

March 2014 - News!

Conferences, Symposiums, Workshops     view all upcoming
 

Attention all AIRS Students and Early Career Researchers

The AIRS Student and Early Career Researcher Workshop will be taking place at Ryerson University in Toronto from June 27 to 29, 2014. Please find below the registration, abstract and travel funding forms.

2014 Registration Form (AIRS Student and ECR Workshop - Toronto)

2014 Student and ECR abstract submission form  

2014 Student and ECR travel submission form
 

AIRS News

C'était en 2004, lors d'un atelier d'apprentissage de chants, dans l'unité Alzheimer de la résidence des Pervenches (établissement du groupe Hom'Age), à Biéville-Beuville (Calvados). Odile Letortu, médecin coordonnateur, s'est aperçue que des personnes atteintes de la maladie à des stades modérés à sévères, qui oublient le passé et ne sont a priori plus capables de se rappeler une nouvelle information, réussissaient à apprendre des chansons nouvelles, comme, par exemple, J'ai demandé à la Lune, d'Indochine, ou Le Manège, de Stanislas. 

 

  • AIRS collaborator Alda Oliveira Federal University of Bahia, Brazil, was interviewed in a recent article in Epoch Times. "Pro Pianist Loves Shen Yun." 2 MAR 2014

BOSTON — Alda Oliveira, a pro pianist and music educator, attended Shen Yun Performing Arts at the Citi Wang Theatre, Mar. 2, together with her husband Gamary, who is a composer.

​Papers include AIRS co-investigator Dr. Petra Hauf's "Emotional engagement and information processing: Infants' shift of visual attention in infant-directed singing and speaking events" co-authored with Murphy, S., and AIRS PhD student Niusha Ghazban's paper "Emotion regulation in distresed infants using maternal vocalizations: Evidence from physiological and behavioural measures" with co-authors Frank Russo, Sandra Trehub, and Jean-Paul Boudreau.

 

February 2014 - News!

Conferences, Symposiums, Workshops    view all upcoming

  • First call for Symposia for the 24th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Science (CSBBCS). This year, the conference will be held at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, from July 3 to 5, 2014

    Please note that CSBBCS membership and registration for CSBBCS 2014 are separate. Only CSBBCS members who have paid their annual dues can register for the conference as members. We encourage all registrants to become CSBBCS members ( https://www.csbbcs.org/membership ) as this will be the cheaper option. To renew your membership or join the csbbcs, go to: www.csbbcs.org

  • LENA International Conference 2015 -  From Research to Intervention, April 19th – April 21st  2015, Ritz-Carlton Denver, Colorado. Proposal submission begins  Aug. 11, 2014

  • The Canadian Studies Programme at the University of Prince Edward Island - Call for Papers: Versions of Canada, Charlottetown, September 25-27, 2014 

    To mark the 150th anniversary of the Charlottetown Conference, The Canadian Studies Programme at UPEI will host an interdisciplinary conference entitled Versions of Canada. The conference will coincide with the Annual General Meeting of the Canadian Studies Network. The version of Canada that emerged 150 years ago was neither a clean starting point nor a sharp end point in the project of Canadian nation-making. In the days before and since Charlottetown, Canadians have offered-up many versions of what Canada was, is, and could be. To assert those definitions, to offer those versions – whether they emerge from writers, poets, artists, musicians, academics, broadcasters, or politicians – is to make a nation, to engage in what the Canadian intellectual Frank Underhill nearly 70 years ago called the “’moral struggle over the fundamental principles on which society should be based.” Versions of Canada recognizes the complexity and contest involved in charting the meaning of Canada.  We invite papers, panels of three and a moderator, roundtables and other forms of presentations organized around the broad theme of “versions” of Canada. We suggest (but do not demand) linkage to one or more of the following sub-themes: images, cultures, politics, narratives, discourses, places, identities, powers, authorities, experiences. Please send your abstract of 350 words, along with a one page curriculum vitae (for each presenter), and contact information by April 28th, 2014 to our Academic Programme Committee: for proposals in English, Greg Doran, English Department, University of Prince Edward Island, gdoran@upei.ca
     
  • New! On New Shores Conference October 16 – 17, 2014, Toronto, Ontario. The theme of the conference will be Immigrant and Ethnic Minority Families: Bridging Across Cultural Boundaries. Call for Proposals

Proposal submission deadline is March 1, 2014.  All proposals must be submitted to Dr. Susan S. Chuang by email: (schuang@uoguelph.ca), and must be accompanied by a submission form.

 

AIRS News

This survey was created by Shannon Coates (DMA Candidate, University of Toronto) to find quantitative data showing the level of consistency of terminology used by speech language pathologists, otolaryngologists, and singing teachers throughout North America. The survey was approved by the University of Toronto Ethics Board on 24th January, 2014 and forms a major part of Shannon's doctoral research. Your participation is completely anonymous and voluntary, and data collected from this survey will remain confidential, non-identifiable, and will be used for research purposes only. While participation in this survey will not benefit you directly, it will contribute to the voice community as a whole, and you may find benefit from reflecting upon the terminology that you use in your studio,clinic, or practice.

The survey takes approximately 20 minutes to complete and you may complete it all at once, or in more than one sitting. By clicking on the survey link, you are consenting to voluntary participation, acknowledging that you are at least eighteen years of age, and that you treat or teach classical singers in your studio, clinic, or practice. Shannon anticipates collecting data from 1st February 2014 until 15  March 2014, after which the survey link will no longer be active.

 As a larger survey sample size will ensure more significant data,  leading to a greater impact on the clarification of terminology used in  the voice community, Shannon would be grateful if you would consider forwarding the survey link to any of your colleagues who teach or treat  classical singers.

The survey may be accessed via this link: Interdisciplinary Survey on Common Usage of Breathing Terminology
 If you have any questions concerning the research or the survey, please contact Shannon or her supervisor (contact information below). Your time and dedication to voice research is valuable and highly appreciated.

Shannon Coates, DMA Candidate in Vocal Performance, Specializing in Voice Pedagogy, University of Toronto   shannon.coates@utoronto.ca
Professor Lorna MacDonald, Lois Marshall Chair in Voice Studies, University of Toronto  lorna.macdonald@utoronto.ca
 

  • The AIRS Proposal for the International Association of Music and Medicine has been accepted for presentation at the next annual meeting to be held in Toronto, in June 25-27.  Thanks to Laurel Young, Concordia University, Sub-theme leader of 3.3 for organizing this, as well as the consultation of Amy  Clement-Cortes. Other participants include: Carol Beynon,  Annabel Cohen, Carina Daugherty, Mary Gick, Jennifer Hutchison,  Jennifer Nicol, Steven Livingstone, Lucille McGarry, and  Frank Russo.

  •  Rena Sharon and co-authors Laurel Fais and Eric Vatikiotis-Bateson have a chapter in the new book, Language and the Creative Mind by Mike Borkent, Barbara Dancygier and Jennifer Hinnell (release date: 15 February 2014). The chapter is entitled "Wiggle Room: How Gestural Parameters Affect Singer and Audience Cognition in Art Song Performance."

  • New: AIRS-inspired multicultural singing group and song circle at the University of Malta  initiated by Dr. Godfrey Baldacchino.  (Missing from photo: Vince Fabri, photographer).  
      
                                                                    

     

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