April 2015 - News!

Conferences, Symposiums, Workshops    view all upcoming

  • 2nd International Digital Libraries for Musicology workshop (DLfM 2015), 25th July 2015 (full day), Knoxville, TN, USA. Co-hosted with the ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2015.  LINK
     

AIRS News

AIRS Collaborator Johan Sundberg has organized World Voice Day for the  3rd year in a row.  These year over 500 events are taking place, including Frank Russo's  (AIRS Leader Theme 2)  Smartlab Singers (50+ Choir)


Recent Publications

  • just published by June Countryman, Martha Gabriel,  and Katherine Thompson, a collaboration from professors in music education,  education, and a graduate student in psychology contributing to sub-theme 2.1 Learning to Sing Naturally                                                                            

Countryman, J., Gabriel, M., & Thompson, K. (2015).  Children's spontaneous vocalisations during play: aesthetic dimensions.  Music Education Research, DOI: 10.1080/14613808.2015.1019440.

This paper explores the phenomenon of spontaneous vocalisations in the self-chosen, unstructured outdoor play of children aged 3–12. Spontaneous vocalisations encompass the whole range of children’s unprompted, natural, expressive vocal soundings beyond spoken language. Non-participant observations at childcare centres and on elementary school playgrounds anchor this investigation into the nature and extent of children’s spontaneous vocalising, grounded in scholarship that establishes these musical expressions as socially embedded and culturally contingent. Previous research has usually considered these ubiquitous playground soundings from a functional standpoint. Our project examines the potential of applying Dissanayake’s artification hypothesis, specifically her five affective aesthetic devices, to examples of children’s vocalisations to make tangible the artistry inherent in these spontaneous soundings. Pedagogical implications are considered.

  • Just published  by Mary Gick and Jennifer Nicol, co-investigators in sub-theme 3.3  Singing and Well-being:

    Gick, M. L.  & Nicol, J. J. (2015).  Singing for respiratory health: theory, evidence and challenges.  Health Promotion International,  1-10. doi: 10.1093/heapro/dav013. 

    The premise that singing is a health promoting activity for people with respiratory conditions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma is a growing area of interest being investigated by researchers from various disciplines. The preliminary evidence, a theoretical framework and identification of methodological challenges are discussed in this perspective article with an eye to recommendations for further research to advance knowledge. After a brief summary of main research findings on singing in healthy people to provide background context, research is reviewed on singing in people with COPD and asthma. Studies include published research and as yet unpublished work by the authors. Methodological challenges arising from the reviewed studies are identified such as attrition from singing or control groups based on weak and strong, respectively, beliefs about singing’s effectiveness. Potential solutions for these problems are considered with further recommendations made for other singing research.    LINK
     

  • Just published by  Sandra Trehub (AIRS Co-investigator and Sub-theme co-leader 1.2 singing as multimodal experience)  and her colleagues

Enhanced processing of vocal melodies in childhood, Weiss MW, Schellenberg EG, Trehub SE, Dawber EJ, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Dev Psychol 251(3):370-7

Music cognition is typically studied with instrumental stimuli. Adults remember melodies better, however, when they are presented in a biologically significant timbre (i.e., the human voice) than in various instrumental timbres (Weiss, Trehub, & Schellenberg, 2012). We examined the impact of vocal timbre on children's processing of melodies. In Study 1, 9- to 11-year-olds listened to 16 unfamiliar folk melodies (4 each of voice, piano, banjo, or marimba). They subsequently listened to the same melodies and 16 timbre-matched foils, and judged whether each melody was old or new.  Vocal melodies were recognized better than instrumental melodies, which did not differ from one another, and the vocal advantage was consistent across age. In Study 2, 5- to 6-year-olds and 7- to 8-year-olds were tested with a simplified design that included only vocal and piano melodies.  Both age groups successfully differentiated old from new melodies, but memory was more accurate for the older group. The older children recognized vocal melodies better than piano melodies, whereas the younger children tended to label vocal melodies as old whether they were old or new. The results provide the first evidence of differential processing of vocal and instrumental melodies in childhood.    LINK

March 2015 - News!

Conferences, Symposiums, Workshops    view all upcoming
 

AIRS News

February 2015 - News!

Conferences, Symposiums, Workshops    view all upcoming

  • The 11th International Symposium on Cognition and Musical Arts (SIMCAM), promoted by the Brazilian Association of Cognition and Musical Arts (ABCM) in partnership with the Federal University of Goiás (UFG), will be held in the historic city of Pirenópolis (near Goiânia), between 26 and 29 May.  LINK

  • The Changing Face of Music and Art Education - Music Educators and Researchers of Young Children (CFMAE-MERYC) 2015 International Conference: Playful Sounds – Personhood, May 5-9, 2015, Tallinn University Institute of Fine Arts Department of Music, Tallinn, Estonia.   LINK 

AIRS News

  • AIRS 6th Annual Meeting.  The AIRS 6th Annual Meeting (2015) will  take place in Nashville, Tennessee  (Music City, USA ☺) July 30-31, prior to the biennial meeting of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition (SMPC) co-convened by Reyna Gordon and Elisabeth Dykens).  Abstracts for the AIRS Symposium will be requested by the end of February and a template will be provided for this as well as for interest in performing at the AIRS concert which will take place the evening of July 31

    Dr. Ron Eavy, who is the chair of Vanderbilt's Department of Otolaryngology and director of the Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Hearing and Speech Sciences, has kindly agreed to serve as a liaison  between the SMPC local organizing committee and AIRS.  AIRS is looking forward to connecting with members of the renowned Voice Center and AIRS attendees.  The  dates July 31 and the morning of August 1 there will be some events for students, and the AIRS Policy and Planning Committee will be taking place on the evening of July 30. The SMPC conference itself will run from  August  1st, 1 pm to noon August 5th.

    Those attending the AIRS meeting will have the opportunity to present their research at SMPC by submitting abstracts through the SMPC website; deadline for submission has been extended to Feb. 13 at 11pm CDT.  Tentatively, please pencil in the dates July 30 and 31 on your calendar. The SMPC conference itself will run from July 31st 1 pm to noon August 5th. Those attending the AIRS meeting will have the opportunity to present their research at SMPC (by submitting abstracts through the usual SMPC channels), and AIRS will also be working with Jessica Grahn, the SMPC conference program organizer, to determine the possibility of including an AIRS event within the SMPC program itself (e.g., a special poster session on singing, a symposium, or singing performance event).

    Your thoughts and suggestion will be welcome as we move forward. Both the music and health industries are prominent in Nashville, and the Vanderbilt University community will also add a valuable context to this SMPC meeting, already plenty wonderful by itself (recall the last Ryerson meeting of SMPC!). 

    AIRS will also be working with Jessica Grahn, the SMPC conference program organizer, to determine the possibility of including an AIRS event in the SMPC program itself (e.g., a special poster session on singing, a symposium, or singing performance event).  Your thoughts and suggestion will be welcome as we move forward.  Both the music and health industries are prominent in Nashville, and  the Vanderbilt University community will also add a valuable context to this SMPC meeting.

  • AIRS Researcher (sub-theme 2.2)  Dr. Karen Jensen, in the Desautels Faculty of Music at the University of Manitoba has had two papers just accepted by the Journal of Voice.  These papers focus on the significance and pedagogical application of the vocal breakthrough.  One paper discusses conditions and stages, while the other examines attentional phenomena.  The papers acknowledge the seminal role of AIRS. Through AIRS,  Karen and Dr. Jane Ginsborg(Royal Northern College of Music, UK) have developed a fruitful collaboration. Jane visited Karen last year, and Karen will be presenting a talk and seminars at RNCM in March. Thanks go to Marcel A. Desautels for research support, and to the University of Manitoba, and RNCM for travel support.
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